And To Think That I Read It On Mulberry Street

Dr Seuss Books

Yesterday, Dr. Seuss Enterprises (the organization in charge of the Dr. Seuss literary legacy) announced that it would discontinue the publication of six iconic children’s books, because “These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong.” The six books are And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, If I Ran the Zoo, McElligot’s Pool, On Beyond Zebra!, Scrambled Eggs Super!, and The Cat’s Quizzer. The decision was made because Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) had used racial stereotypes in these books, portraying Blacks and Asians in demeaning ways.

It has been so long since I’ve read any of these books that I don’t really remember much about the illustrations or racial attitudes. But then, I am neither Black nor Asian. I assume that if he had done the same to Jews, I would remember it clearly, because I am a Jew.

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it” ~ George Santayana

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Video: Preparing Newborns & Toddlers to Love Books & Reading

In this first episode of my new interview series, I chatted with Saroj Ghoting, the Early Childhood Literacy consultant, about how to prepare newborns and young children to be ready to learn to read. More importantly, Saroj shared tips for engaging children in the joy of books which will make them lifelong readers.

 

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About Saroj Ghoting

Saroj Ghoting is an Early Childhood Literacy Consultant and national trainer on early literacy. She presents early literacy training and information sessions at national, regional, and state conferences, and training for library staff and their partners. She has been a consultant for the Public Library Association and the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association on the Every Child Ready to Read @ your library® early literacy initiative. She has authored seven books on early childhood literacy including The Early Literacy Kit: A Handbook and Tip Cards, Storytimes for Everyone! Developing Young Children’s Language and Literacy, STEP into Storytime: Using StoryTime Effective Practice to Strengthen the Development of Newborns to Five-Year-Olds and Time for a Story: Sharing Books with Infants and Toddlers.