Poetic License 007

I love understanding the roots of words, it colors them and gives layers of meaning when we use them. So, I’m signed up for the emailed words of the day from Dictionary.com, A.Word.A.Day with Anu Garg, and Visual Thesaurus.

For instance, consider the word iniquity (which was highlighted some time ago in an email from Visual Thesaurus). The root is the same as equity or equal. But with the opposing prefix “in,” the word has come to mean unequal, therefore wrong, therefore evil. At least that’s how the word has evolved and come down to us. So, if I use iniquity in a story, it would color the sense of wrongness with an underlyingRead More

Slang: The Secret Handshake that Separates “Us” from “Them”

Shalom Salam by Sally Wiener GrottaOkay, I admit it, I’m acrynomically challenged. It seems that new abbreviations appear daily on my twitter feed, in emails, even in articles of magazines that I think of as mainstream (i.e. written in “commonly accepted” English). And I’m sent scurrying to Google to try to find the newest definitions for acronyms that didn’t exist or meant something entirely different the last time I looked.

Language has always been the dividing line between “insiders” and “outsiders.” In one story in the Bible, how a person pronounced the word “shibboleth” determined whether a sentry would kill him or let him pass. So it has been through the centuries. Words and accents have determined what tribe will accept you, whether it’s social class, professional standing or “belonging” to a certain group, gang or tribe. But it seems to me that it’s gotten worse in this digital age.

Of course, language is a living, malleable thing, always changing. The slang of the 1920s is now considered either passé or has been integrated into college curriculum for English Lit 101. As an author, I enjoy Read More