Why I Use a Medium Format Camera

I’ve often spoken about the optical qualities of medium format photography. But hearing about how the size of the individual pixels of my Pentax 645D provides greater dynamic range, or that the lenses are superior than DSLRs and other typical cameras doesn’t mean as much as seeing the difference. (*Please see NOTE at the end of this blog.)

Take, for instance, the photograph of Watson (“W. Dog Reading T. Wolfe”) that accompanied our guest blogging guidelines. In the zoomed in image of his eye, notice the quality of detail. Also, for those of you who know how to read such things, I’ve attached the histogram, so you can see the density of data. If you want to see more detail, click on the caption below the image, to see a larger zoomed-in view. (Remember, it’s only a low resolution screen capture, but it should give you an idea of the level of detail in the photograph.)

No, it isn’t only about having more megapixels, but how those pixels capture light, shadow, color and detail. Of course, it’s overkill if my only purpose were to post pictures on the Internet. But when I create my large exhibition prints (some as large as 40″ x 60″), I need that level of clarity and quality.


*NOTE: A medium format camera is significantly bigger and heavier than the largest of DSLR pro cameras. At its heart is a physically larger image sensor which means that each pixel is larger than those on the DSLRs of the same resolution. Those larger pixels are better able to capture more and better light and color. In addition, the lenses feature superior optics.

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